Impressions from the Forum Vini wine fair pt.1 4


 International wine fair Munich

If you’re following me on Twitter then you might have red my tweets from the Forum Vini wine fair. The fair took place in Munich from November 9th to November 11th. Vintners and wine-importers from Germany, Austria, Italy, France, Australia, Argentina, South Africa, Greece, Portugal and Bulgaria presented their wines. For some reason there was not a single vintner from North America at the fair. The entry ticket included free wine-tasting of all wines at the fair. Best of all it only cost 15€/day – a good deal compared to the VinItaly in Verona where a day ticket costs around 80€.

Forum Vini Logo

Events at the Forum Vini

One of the events at the annual Forum Vini is the Bordeaux-tasting where one can try up to 100 Bordeaux (red and white). For French wine-drinkers this tasting is usually the highlight of the fair. I’ve tried a bunch of Bordeaux wines and some were good but the majority of affordable Bordeaux did not have a very-good price-quality relation. Therefore I decided not to buy any.

Another highlight was the German Mosel-Riesling tasting. Small and large wineries from the Mosel presented their different Rieslings and one could try them all next to each other – from a dry Kabinett to a sweet Spätlese.

There was also a Chateauneuf du Pape wine tasting. Before going to the fair I was already looking forward to try some of these wines. More on that later.

Wines I tried

White wines

My tasting-experience started with white wines – to be precise with two Austrian Grüner Veltliner from the Weinviertel. Both Grüner Veltliner were from Weingut Harald Haimer. First I tried their Weißer Berg Weinviertel DAC and then their Kirchberg Weinviertel DAC. The first one was fruity with aromas of bananas and peach. On the palate there was some acidity and some minerals. The wine finish was medium. The other Grüner Veltliner was fruity, too but had a heavy redcurrant aroma. Kirchberg had a longer finish and more acidity. It was less mineralic though. Both wines had 12.5% ABV. At the end the wines were nothing special really.

From Austria I moved on to the Mosel Rieslings. I tried five different Rieslings which came from two wineries. Two dry Kabinett, a dry Auslese, a fruity Auslese and a fruity Spätlese. The fruity Spätlese and the fruity Auslese were from Markus Molitor which you might remember from this wine review: 2007 Markus Molitor – Zeltinger Sonnen Uhr Kabinett – Prädikatswein. Dry Rieslings are definitely more for my taste but I can see how some people enjoy the fruity ones, too.


Afterwards I went to a Prosecco Valdobbiadene tasting where the winery Ciodet offered their Millesimato and their Extra Dry sparkling wines.Ciodet Spumanti Forum Vini

Their Millesimato Valdobbiadene DOCG Prosecco was simply outstanding. Produced with 100% Prosecco grapes (also known as Glera). A bit fruity, very long perlage (bubbles). Much like Champagne just more aromatic and much more affordable (around 14€/bottle). Their Extra Dry Valdobbiadene DOCG Spumante was less fruity and much drier (what a surprise!). Good perlage. Both are recommended.

The next white wine was from the organic winery Savian from the Veneto region in Italy. I tried their Chardonnay. A well-structured wine with pineapple, apple, and lime aromas. The wine can be described as elegant. The finish was medium-long.

Afterwards I moved on to one of my favorite wineries – Tenute Loacker. Loacker offered a wine-tasting from their two Tuscan estates. Since I already know most of their wines I decided not to try all their wines. The last white wine that I tasted was the 2010 Tenute Loacker – Valdifalco Vermentino -  IGT Maremma. I’ve never tried the wine before since I’m not a big fan of Tuscan Vermentino. In my opinion Vermentino should only be planted on Sardinia – at least Sardinian Vermentino can taste quite good. Loacker’s Valdifalco Vermentino was very dry. Intensive aromas of herbs, a medium finish, and low minerality read my notes.


Red wines

Finally I moved on to the red wines. I could have tried many more white wines but time was running out so I had to quickly move on. I stayed at Tenute Loacker’s stand to try the brand new 2007 Tenute Loacker – Valdifalco Riserva – Morellino di Scansano DOCG. Expect a detailed wine-review for the Valdifalco Riserva in the near future. You might remember the 2004 Valdifalco Riserva which I reviewed, too. Tenute Loacker produces the Valdifalco Riserva only with the best vintages.

The next red wine was again from Tenute Loacker. This time it was their 2005 Brunello – Brunello di Montalcino DOCG. The sommelier at their stand said that they decanted the wine for around 90 minutes. Like all Brunello di Montalcino the wine was made with 100% Sangiovese grapes. It aged in small French oak barrels. The wine had a ruby red-color. On the nose there were dark fruits, cinnamon, vanilla, caramel and much more. The wine was well-bodied but the glasses in which they served the wine were way too small for this wine.. Anyways the wine was complex, had a persistently long finish, was dry and a bit tannic. I’m not the biggest fan of Brunello di Montalcino wines but the wine convinced me and is recommended.

Enough Loacker for one day and so I thought to visit the Veneto area once again. This time I was looking for Valpolicella Superiore and Amarone. I only found one stand with these wines and they turned out to be a flop. So I decided not to take any notes for them and quickly moved on to the Piedmont. I was hoping to try some great Barolo DOCG and Barbaresco DOCG. Unlike with the Veneto there were so many vintners at the Forum Vini from the Piedmont. I was able to try great some really great wines. Read more about them in the next part of my Impressions from the Forum Vini wine fair.

To be continued. Part 2 will feature the 100 Bordeaux wine-tasting. Moreover I’ll share my experience with Chateauneuf du Pape. And of course much more with many wines from Italy, Greece and Overseas.

I’m looking forward to your comments on the wine fair and the wines that I tried! Share your thoughts with us in the comment section.


 




About Julian Rossello

Julian Rossello was born and raised in Munich, Germany. Throughout his life, he had the chance to live in Italy and the United States. He traveled through most of Europe and wine has always been one of his passions. He believes that there is always more to discover. When it comes to wine, Julian favors Italian red wines but he will try pretty much any thing (at least once). Sharing his experience and to connect with fellow wine lovers was one of his motivations to start Vino in Love. Connect with Julian on Google+ and Follow him on Twitter


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